About your Search

20121001
20121031
SHOW
Hannity 18
( more )
STATION
CSPAN 103
FOXNEWS 84
CNN 77
CNNW 74
CSPAN2 73
MSNBC 50
MSNBCW 49
WRC 23
WHUT (Howard University Television) 22
WETA 20
FBC 19
WTTG 16
WUSA (CBS) 16
KQED (PBS) 15
CURRENT 14
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 859
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 862 (some duplicates have been removed)
with another from canada, creating a potentially devastating hybrid that could ravage parts of the u.s. northeast early next week. president obama took a break from campaigning thursday to cast an early ballot in his hometown of chicago. speaking at the polling center, obama encouraged americans to take advantage of early voting. >> for all of you who have not yet voted early, i just want everybody to see what an incredibly efficient process this was, thanks to the outstanding folks who are at this particular polling place. obviously, folks in illinois and take advantage of this. but all across the country, we are seeing a lot of early voting. it means you do not have to figure out whether you need to taint time off work, figure out how to pick up the kids, and still cast your ballot if something happens on election day, you'll have already taken care of it. and as bad weather, w you will weather,et. or in chicago, snowy. this was really convenient. >> campaigning in ohio, mitt romney predicted to supporters his election would mean an increase in workers' take-home pay. >> the presiden
they're both potentially vulnerable. also, shocking video shows workers for a u.s. security contractor in afghanistan allegedly partying up, seemingly so drunk and drugged they could hardly speak. >>> plus, a reason to take the window seat. we have the amazing story of how airline passengers spotted and help save a man who had been stranded at sea for nine days. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer and you're in "the situation room." >>> monday's third and final presidential debate will be a serious challenge for both candidates. it's focused on international policy and arena where both mitt romney lacks experience and the obama administration is under growing criticism, especially when it comes to the situation in the middle east. let's start with cnn's white house correspondent dan loathian. i assume officials in the white house campaign they know the president has questions he's going to answer. >> reporter: that's correct, wolf. and there doesn't appear to be much of a difference between the two candidates when it comes to forei
dollars to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp out color. -- we can stamp out hunger. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: phyllis bennis is the new director for the international ism project. she joined us tonight from new york. it is good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you, tavis. poopsie but in and ryan went -- tavis: biden and ryan went after it tonight. it was interesting for a lot of people to watch. but we get back to it really matters, the two guys at the top of the ticket, president obama and governor romney. given that governor romney came back out with his own policy speech, that policy will get on to the agenda in the next two debates in the last debate is exclusively about foreign policy. we know we are headed in that direction but the speech that mr. ravi gave earlier this week, he essentially suggested that president obama had been weak on foreign policy. he went on to deconstructs that and explain it in a variety of ways. but yourhoughts on mr. romney's approach to put foreig
. then the killing of valeria "munique" tachiquin. why did u.s. border patrol agents killed a u.s. citizen, mother of five here in the nine states several miles north of the mexican border. >> state-sponsored terrorism and what is happening at the u.s.- mexican border. we are not allowed to leave our committees without going to checkpoints. i am a u.s. national and a mexican national, and i get stopped every single time i get out of my house, by the border patrol. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road at stanford university in palo alto, california. at least one civilian was killed in pakistan on wednesday when u.s. drone struck the tribal area of north missouri stand. to others for also reportedly wounded and possibly killed. the obama administration has secretly developed a new long- term mechanism for monitoring, capturing, and killing suspected terrorists well into the future. according to the washington post, the administration is maintaining what it calls a disposition matrix that would help
and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the devel
in the u.s. intelligence community and had many high ranking positions in it, including executive director, director for the cia, and his final position was national intelligence officer for the near east and south asia where he provided analytical support. and he was a visiting fellow at brookings in the year 2000, and as a reserve officer in the u.s. army, and has also been publishing externally important literature the last few years since retiring from the government. so i will step out of the way now. .. >> what are the prospects for a new president achievement anding a peace setment between israelis and palestinians? i believe, unfortunately, that they are not very good. by a fair settlement i mean a two-state solution, a palestinian state on comprising gaza and the west bank with some modern negotiated land swaps with control of its border, its borders, its water resources, its air space. something similar to the clinton parameters of 2000. i believe that this outcome more than any alternative would satisfy the core needs for security and self-determination of both israelis and pale
weakness from asia and to a lesser extent, weakness in the u.s. as well. asia slowdown really hittin>> i cart and horse on that. the euro is falling to a session low, post those two bits of data. bund futures extending their gains as well. may not do anything for stock sentiment. talking about asia, china's manufacturing activity was up at a three-month high. the early read suggests the recovery. that wasn't enough to stop a 12th consecutive month of pmi contraction. some analysts still see the need for further stimulus. what is this telling us? are we now on the bottom of the downturn? not the downturn, the slowdown? >> possibly. it's too early to tell. it's only just in -- >> suggest there the chinese survey, the official government one might come out above 50. >> it may well do. but i think one of the interesting things was that the rate of decline has eased quite significantly. the smallest fall for five months. but in there, when we were reading through the reasons, they were saying that their trade had been disrupted due to the spat between japan and china. if we perhaps make a men
. . >> new details revealed in the death of u.s. border patrol agent nicholas ivie, fbi officials now saying friendly fire was likely to blame near the arizona-mexico border. investigators say they're still looking into the case for definitive answers, meanwhile, homeland security secretary janet napolitano making a trip to nicholas' homes and expressing condolences and joining her on the trip. the border patrol commander says that nicholas ivie died a true hero. >> investigators have made progress into the investigation, into agent ivy's death and are looking into the possibility that it was a tragic accident. the result of friendly fire. i explained to agent ivie's family that if the investigation ultimately reaches that conclusion, it changes none of the facts, that agent ivie gave the ultimate sacrifice and died serving his country. that he died in the line of duty, and will be honored as such for his final act of service. >> certainly, he will be missed. ivie died after he and two other agents responded to an alarm triggered by a sensor aimed at detecting smugglers, another agent was wo
at 8 on c-span. later, the candidates hoping to represent arizona's 9th district in the u.s. house, democrat kirsten and steven later here on c-span2. >> what is the dinner, and how did it come about? >> so the al smith dinner is the most famous that presidential candidates show up every four years, and they show up, democrats and republicans -- i mean, it's really a memorial dinner for smith, and i think it's the thing that if anyone heard al smith's name at this point in time, that that's where you heard about al smith unless you hang around these hallowed halls. it's his lasting legacy, the place where the name gets out. it's held every year, not just every four years. prominent figures come in, it's a memorial dinner, a catholic charity dinner. people get together to assess the legacy of al smith and presidential candidates always especially to crack jokes about each other. >> in fact, they show up together most times, show up both the democrat and republican nominees show up together. we want to show you some of the past al smith's dinners. >> might i ask if senior clark comes
. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq, which was serious and opposed in syria was turning a blind life is not helping jihad discussed the area into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there's a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say they were next on the hit list, so they were doing everything they could to help make this happen. there's one high-level syrian official told me later on, of course we were helping them across. you know what? we wanted you guys to kill them. that's why we wanted to go because we wanted these guys to kill you guys. we don't want them in our country. unfortunately they killed a lot of our boys. when he survived and particularly after the assassination of former lebanese rafik hariri, that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria and people in late 2005 were counting the days for the assad regime. the expatriates, organization just waiting to move in one assad fell. but that created in hand and triumphalism and survivalism that very muc
as 2006, and the reason is this. in -- after the u.s. invasion of iraq which syria posed, and syria was turning a blind eye cannot help but the hottest, there is a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say that that there are next on the hit list so there would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level official told me the wrong, of course were helping. you know why? we wanted you guys to kill them. we don't want them in our country. when you survive that, particularly after the assassination, that was blamed on syria but most of the national community. the pressure just escalated exponentially after that. people work in late 2005 counting the days for the gasol regime. syrian expatriates, organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that. in that thing that really created in him a sense of triumph and some and survivalism that very much informed his view of the world and response to the uprising in march 2011 because it instill then him the sense of destiny, righteousness, that he survived the best shot the west could t
frequently find numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man as seen things happen and comments on them in my humble opinion in a reasonable and accurate way. he will be followed by doc or robert freedman who is the meyer hall pearl pearl storm professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and a visiting professor of political science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to the u.s. department of state and central intelligence agency and he is the author of four books, soviet foreign-policy and also the editor and has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank the strategic study institutes expert on soviet lock and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline in russia's changing position in asia and coeditor of the soviet military in the future, and the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen my colleague at heritage who is the senior fellow
people to unite. the economic penalties by the eu and the u.s. have caused the value of the currency, the riyal, to plummet. thousands of people took to the streets of tehran two weeks ago in protest. a spokesperson from iran's petroleum ministry said earlier this month a natural gas embargo would have no effect as the country doesn't export it to the eu. iran has the second largest natural gas reserves in the world. officials say they plan to expand exports to turkey and other neighboring countries. but these latest sanctions could affect those plans. >>> eu foreign ministers agreed to tighten sanctions against syria, too. they've been trying to pressure president bashar al assad to stop a crackdown on his own people. the ministers shared their concerns about the spread of the conflict into turkey and other neighboring countries. they agreed to impose sanctions on more individuals and companies. >> we've added 28 people to the list of those subject to a travel ban and an asset freeze. two additional entities were targeted with an asset freeze. >> 54 entities and 181 people are now s
between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
and the reason is this. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq which syria opposed, and syria was turning a blind eye to cross into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there was a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to fail and they thought they were next on the hit list so they would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level syrian official told me later on, he said of course they were helping iraq. we wanted our guys to kill them. that is why we went into iraq. we wanted to get them out and get them through and you guys would kill them. and when he survived, particularly after the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february 2005 that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria. people in late 2005 for counting the days when the assad regime, there were syrian expatriates and organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that and i think that really created in him a sense of triumphalist and survivalism that very much infor
. >> thank you. thanks to having us again and again. i'm a u.s. correspondent for swiss newspapers but i have a question for you, henry. you haven't mentioned the governor of ohio at all in your analysis. was that on purpose or you don't think he plays a role? >> i've never found that governors matter a whole lot in presidential races. they don't poll states along with it. they can help of volunteer but their stamping or their popularity almost never actually comes over. the one thing i should've mentioned, i didn't though, is that the case it raise from two years ago is a good indicator. made ronnie's weakness. which is that john kasich after he left congress came from an investment bank backer and accuse running against somebody, before he was governor, was a representative from that west virginia part of ohio, and they rent a class warfare campaign. it was eyes on the side of the working class man, he comes on the site of the wealthy. and kasich in the atmosphere by 2010 only won by about two points. and if you look, he did much better in the affluent suburbs than he did in working-class a
week we had the host committee that looked into cyber crimes warning cyber attacks on u.s. financial institutions are going to pick up but wasn't from the group that ties itself to islamic radicals, they're more concerned about cyber crimes from iran and china. melissa: is it less effective if your notes are going to do it? >> we are doing this in reality it is somebody else may be doing it. melissa: china and u.s. on the rocks again for the second time fo,this time it is about solar cells to these. coming up next. lori: one airline is make it possible to use your phone in the air. gold is way down, this is the stock market down a little bit. silver also lower. back with more after this. melissa: china and the u.s. at odds for the second time this week as the subsidy reaches him. rich. >> the commerce department is looking to move forward this week hitting them with terrorists. folks and chinese businesses and trade policies charging that government was heavily subsidizing green energies in other industries. u.s. is also subsidized green energy and one international trade attorney wh
a treaty of friendship and cooperation. by 1974, as egypt began to move into the u.s. orbit, syria emerged as the no. 1 ally. not to say there are no problems between the two sides. the syrian intervention in lebanon clearly displeased moscow as did its agreement to security council to hundred 42. it's one of the few states that supported the soviet invasion of afghanistan in 1979 and was richly rewarded with military aid as a result. that continued until the advent of gorbachev in 1985 to turn off the tap of military aid. the chill in the relationship continued until 2005 when a combination of increasing syrian isolation due to policies in lebanon and a much more aggressive russian foreign policy under vladimir putin established a close russian- syrian relationship we see today. let's look at the policies of vladimir putin in his second term. i see is reacting to be setbacks like the school fiasco, the orange revolution in the ukraine, and the increasing vulnerability of the u.s. in the middle east because of the invasion of iraq which -- and because of the revival in the taliban in afgha
to con convenience the debate to discuss a topic that's quite critical and the u.s. china relationship is definitely most strategic bilateral relationship. tonight's program will include 90 minutes of unintrumpted -- uninterpreted of key u.s.-china relations, and then we conclude with a question and answer period that would be questions collected from all of you, and as well as audience from around the world, twitter, e-mail, and live stream. the format we have this evening is based on the guidelines published by the commission on presidential debates, and there are two sections of questions. professor, one of the co-moderators, will address the first with six questions, and the other co-moderator direct the questions in the second section with six questions. speakers each have a minute and a half to respond followed by a 30-second rebuttal, and in keeping with proper debate decorum, i want to review a number of rules of engagement. first of all, please take the time now to take out your mobile phones and anything that makes noise and switch to the silent mode. what you can do secondly
saddam hussein. that only happened because of the u.s. invasion of iraq. but then even after the u.s. invasion and the toppling of hussein -- pusan -- a secular liberal government that was willing to cede some of its sovereign rights to a foreign power. some claim it's all different now with the islamic republic because the arab awakening, the demonstration effect will work together with sanctions to find the break the back of the islamic republic. but this ignores the fact that the islamic republic sees the arab awakening as hugely positive, hugely positive. iranian policymakers and analysts believe that any arab government, any arab government that becomes at all more representative of its populations beliefs, concerns and policy preferences will, by definition, be less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to
the ongoing u.s. drone strikes. on sunday, the pakistani government blocked the march from entering the tribal area of south waziristan, a frequent target of drone attacks. addressing the march, pakistan and political leader imran khan said the drone strikes are fostering hatred of the united states. >> these drone attacks are a violation of international law. these drone attacks are a violation of the human rights of the pakistani people. do we all condemn them? we want to send a message to america, the more drone attacks to carry out, the more the people will grow to hate you and raise their arms against you. our tribal people will not be scared off with drone attacks. >> more than 30 u.s. citizens with the group codepink traveled to pakistan to take part in the march and meet with drone strike victims. >> the illegal, immoral, a brutal attacks on the innocent people of waziristan and the fatah region must in now. these are illegal drone strikes carried out by cia. cia is a civilian organization using military equipment rid this is a war crime. >> they are illegal. they are against internati
are unavoidable. the weapons found at his murder scene were traced to the u.s. run scandal we know as operation fast and furious. many involved in that scandal fear the same could be true here. however, deputies say in this case, no weapons were recovered and no suspects are in custody. we'll tell you the search continues. bill? >> what a tragedy that is. william lajeunesse working that story in los angeles. thank you. >>> some internal state department documents now giving us a closer look at how u.s. officials handle security in libya. only two months before the attack on our consulate in benghazi, which killed four americans. fox news has obtained news documents just as two top republican lawmakers sent a letter to the secretary of state hillary clinton. in that letter, darrell issa and jason chain asked how much the department knew about at least a dozen threats to our ambassador. what else are these lawmakers saying here? >> accounts from whistle blowers, top republicans claiming at least 12 security related incidents before the consulate attack, including this rpg attack in benghazi on ju
mentioned before, one of the surprises in the report was how vulnerable the u.s. is still, despite the massive shale oil resolution -- revolution. this is not to say that the progress towards energy independence has not provided measurable gains in energy security and reducing volatility, but it is still there. even in a hypothetical world where the u.s. has not become completely self-sufficient in oil. oil markets are completely integrated and we will drive up prices everywhere, including the u.s.. so, while having diversified fuel diversifies away from oil into natural gas and all of this stuff, we will definitely see benefits. it is not a silver bullet that will completely solve the problem. >> steve, i want to go back to you. they were making your point. >> it is about what to do in a situation with ambiguity. my personal opinion, that is the most likely scenario for the iranians. maybe not over the long term, but certainly over the near term. >> next 10 years, perhaps? >> there are historical precedents for that. south africa actually has six nuclear weapons. they never tested
of is romney presidential in a way that he could lead the u.s. on the world stage? we've seen an ad and a memo out today from the obama campaign trying to paint him as belacose, as not ready, and we expect president obama is going to be doing that tonight here in florida. >> one of the other big issues likely to come up tonight is iran. over the weekend i see your "times" article saying the u.s. and tehran had agreed to one-on-one talks about iran's nuclear program after the election. u.s. will deny that. a lot of people might say what's wrong -- regardless, can the president make the case that his strategy on iran is working or does this give mitt romney an opening? >> you know, the answer may be yes to both of those. obviously president obama would make his case that these are the toughest sanctions ever, and that they have been working. you just look at iran's economy. you look at the value of iran's currency, which has plummeted, and he can say the sanctions are working, but, obviously, governor romney can say they're not really shifting iran to changing its behavior. even if everyone expe
does anything that the u.s. government says, although we still say it. .. i remember when secretary clinton went on her first trip to china she had a forum with 16 women from different areas in china. was blogged, it was streamed, people would challenge the hiv/aids policy, incredibly brave women and secateurs clinton provided a forum for them to speak to a larger audience. these were the kind of things i think we can do. >> a question from right here in the room in the audience. president obama and governor rahm yo both said they want america to have a positive relationship with china but they must play by the rules. how well they pushed china if they think china is not playing by the rules, house specifically, dr. bader? >> how specifically will they -- >> push china if they are not playing by the rules? >> my last act in government, my last time around was second place in negotiations with a succession of the world trade organization. the world trade organization lays out in detail global rules. it was a 17 year negotiation for china, and it made extensive commitments. china used
the chairman of the house of endangering several libyans who have been working with the u.s. by not giving their names when he released 166 pages unclassified libya documents. heading tomorrow night's foreign policy debate are, i have to say, more confusing to me as a consumer of news than they have ever been. we talked about this early on. i will put myself in the category of people who were troubled. category of people who were troubled by what seemed to be a distance between what the reporting and what the intelligence agency seemed to be saying and what was coming out of the white house. i thought that gab was worrisome. we talked about it on the show. i don't know what to think anymore because what looked like it first was officially the u.s. government line was this was spontaneous and in reaction to the video. there was a parallel channel of reporting indicating it was premeditated, the work of al qaeda militants and had nothing to do with the video. there was no protest in the video. that is what happened. now we have reporting from the l.a. times and "the new york times" talking t
in the west faster and cheaper and, therefore, using that to age, take away some of the u.s. market share. they have been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than what other countries around the world are making. they therefore substantial increase their share of the global solar panel market. the problem is they have not been so good in the domestic consumption side. chinese companies export 95% of the solar panels they produce. that's a big from for a lot of chinese citizens and ngos because there sank this is supposed to be about green energy but what we're getting is the factors that make solar panels and have a lot of pollution from the factory. and we are expert in the solar panels to the united states. to u.s. citizens have cleaner air but we do not. that's a really big problem. that's an old model. the old model. the new model would be if they cannot only create the manufacturing solar panel but also creating new innovative types of technology that might be way more efficient than what we have to. but also in staunton and consum
. >> woodruff: that last point involved the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya and the death of ambassador chris stevens on the night of september 11. the administration initially blamed an anti-muslim film for inciting the trouble. more recently officials have said new information indicates it was a terrorist attack. today romney again criticized the president's response in libya. >> i want to be very clear. the blame for the murder of our people in libya and the attacks on our embassies in so many other countries lie solely with those who carry them out. no one else. but it is ouresponsibility and the responsibility of the president to use america's greatest power to shape his not to lead from behind. leaving our destiny at the mercy of events. >> woodruff: for its par, the obama campaign aired a new ad that accused romney of injecting politics into a national tragedy with his initial response to the consulate attack. >> when our u.s. diplomats were attacked in libya, the "new york times" said romney's knee-jerk response showed an extraordinary lack of presidential characte
. the 90-minute debate will most likely start where the second one left off. the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. both candidateses have come under fire for their response to the attack. they'll also be -- there will also be be debate questions about iran's nuclear ambitions and itself u.s. -- the u.s. relationship with china. polls show the economy is the far most important issue to voters. both candidates are also expected to talk about the economy and their foreign policy answers. both candidates have had their walk threw in the debate hall and will spend time with family and friends before the start of tonight's debate. in boca raton, florida, danielle nottingham. back to you. >> thank you for that preview. cbs news' own bob schieffer is the one 340d rate -- moderating tonight's debate. mitt romney will get the first question. we'll have your go to debate station tonight. we're teaming up with our sister publication "u.s.a. today" and beginning at 9:00 p.m. on our website, we'll be live blogging, fact checking what the candidates are saying. you can join the con
and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particularly my colleague, steve coll, who has a recent book published by brookings about feeling betrayed about mus
and they don't have the same capacities to attack the u.s. homeland and our allies as they did four years ago. >> let's go to the next segment. because it's a very important one. it is the rise of china and future challenges for america. i want to just begin this by asking both of you and, mr. president, you go first this time. what do you believe is the greatest future threat to the national security of this country? >> well, i think it will continue to be terrorist networks. we have to remain vigilant, as i just said. but with respect to china, china's both an adversary but also a potential partner in the international community if it's following the rules. so my attitude coming into office was that we are going to insist that china plays by the same rules as everybody else. i know americans had seen jobs being shipped overseas, businesses and workers not getting a level playing field when it came to trade. and that's the reason why i set up a trade task force, to go after cheaters when it came to international trade. that's the reason why we have brought more cases against china for violat
in the u.s. come here in washington, d.c. wide? because they wanted to send a message. and for that matter, i hope that the united states of america, and whoever will be elected, will take a leadership decision, maybe it's not popular that it will be a moral decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. and i don't know how many of you have followed the weekly reports, and what was written there, but something very interesting popped up from the report. when you go into look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today
or otherwise in the building and launching of this drone. but it is worth remembering that a u.s. drone crashed in iran last year. the iranians are the -- at the time made no secret of their intentions of using it. using the technology from that drone to try to build one themselves. israeli officials obviously looking at it closely and likely to know pretty quickly whether or nottish ran was behind this. >> shep: thank you. the real concern across that region tonight, turkey's president says a worst case scenario is playing out in syria. it came as turkey's army fired shells at its one-time alley for the sixth day in a row. the turkish leader vow to do do anything necessary to protect his country and he called fort international community to help topple the syrian regime. turkey began attacking targets in syria last week after a mortar bomb strayed across the border, or at least they report it strayed. it could have been a target. we don't know. we do know it killed several turkish citizens, kellogg young boy. the united nations secretary general warned the violence threatens the entire region.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 862 (some duplicates have been removed)